Be Smart, Be Kind, Be Anything, But Don’t Be A Bully

Cyberbullying-Just Say No

This week’s lecture is all about cyberbullying, what it is, how to prevent it, the signs, and case studies on teenagers that was impacted by it. Cyberbullying involves the use of text to either send or post hurtful, embarrassing text, or images, videos intended to images or harm the other party. It also, may involve unwelcomed texts or emails who they have requested no communication (Essex, 2016). After, reading all the material from this weeks material as well as currently watching 13 Reasons Why, I have learned that today’s technology can have so much influence on our students. Us educators much be very aware of what is going on in our school and our student’s lives. With it finally making 49 states accountable for knowing any information that might involve a student with cyberbullying or bullying that could lead to influence of their depression, could help improve survival rates.

Some student’s see their teachers more than they see their parents. They are probably displaying signs in the class from slipping of their grades, depression, and withdrawal from lectures. The teacher would pick up on the signs if they are really paying close attention to their students. As a parent a way to help prevent or stop cyberbullying is to stay connected with your child. Know your child’s passwords, look through their phones, monitor their work on their laptops, and stay connected to your child.

The best way to help with cyberbullying is to know your child. Most of the parent’s say my child is great I know they wouldn’t do that. But, how do you know they wouldn’t do that? Are you monitoring what they are doing? Are you concerned about them and what they are doing daily? Most will say that is their phone, laptop, or Ipad I do not want to invade their privacy. This is your child and they do not have privacy in your home. Same goes for students in the classroom we need to make sure we are not ignoring behaviors of students picking on other students and sending rude or crude comments via text, social media, or email. We are the adults and they rely on us to make them safe.

We were asked to review Monica Lewinsky Ted Talk – The Price of Shame and evaluate how the scandal would have been played out in today’s technological world. We must be very cautious in today’s word about what we share and what we post on the internet or with friends, coworkers, or family. Although, the government can research almost anything and getting what they need on the average person. But, with one slip to the wrong person or a save on your share on your phone that could put the government in a place to request access to your information should something arise. The shame game being played out on the internet has happened so much for so many. I have hardly witnessed it by friends or family of my age. But I have witnessed celebrities and friends or younger friends that are not mature enough when posting either to Instagram or snapchat stories. One post or screenshot another child has reposted their snap and then are sharing and sending it out to everyone. I have constantly tried to tell my stepchildren, niece and nephew always be cautious of your actions and respect others on internet as if you would like to be treated. It is sad to witness.

I was in the ninth grade when the scandal was released, I remember my grandfather updating me daily as he watched C-span all day long. Or my parents talking about it. It was a huge ordeal even as a high school freshman in East Texas, everyone was talking about it. I am unsure of how it would have played out on social media. I believe it would have been harder for Monica to cope with the media. I see the hateful comments that fans give gorgeous actors or reality stars on selfies or pictures of their children. I could not believe the comments they would have left her or the death threats, or hateful messages that would be typed. People are such cowards behind the keyboard. They feel like they are powerful when they can type their words. But when they face you they are not so powerful they are powerless.

The next video we were prompted to evaluate was Shane Koyczan’s To This Day Project. We were asked if we had unlimited resources, what would you do to prevent cyberbullying and promote kindness? I honestly do not believe there is a way you could prevent it completely. Especially, when you have apps such as snapchat, rate me, and the app where they send comments anonymously. You could regulate the applications but just like anything there will be others that would bypass the laws.

But if I had the resources, I believe I would help start an organization in my community to provide a program to help educate students at the age of ten on how their present actions could affect their future. Not only could it affect someone’s life permanently but, psychophysically. Not all people are created equal and can handle the effects or backlashes of the negativity that is created by rude, inappropriate comments. We should always treat our friends how we would like to be treated. Rather than be in person or behind a keyboard, phone, iPad, camera or a YouTube video. Always make sure your present social media post will not affect your future friends life, schoolmate life, or your profession.

References

Essex, N. L. (2016). School law and the public school: A practical guide for   educational leaders. (6th ed.)

(pp.111-114). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc. Essex_Cyberbullying.pdf

TED. (2015, March 20). The price of shame | Monica Lewinsky. Retrieved from

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_8y0WLm78U

TED. (2013, March 8). “To This Day” … for the bullied and beautiful | Shane Koyczan. Retrieved

from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sa1iS1MqUy4

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